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Vehicles with an asterisk (*) on their names are not on display at the moment.

Japanese Mass Production
Main Building, the 3nd floor/Car Manufacturing by the Japanese
Introduction of Foreign Automotive Technology
If Japan's auto industry lagged behind internationally before the war, there was an even greater gap following it. To close this gap, virtually every Japanese carmaker tied up with foreign makers to learn the latest manufacturing technology. The knowledge acquired contributed a great deal to the advancement of Japan's post-war automobile industry.
Main Building, the 2nd floor Main Building, the 3nd floor Annex, the 2nd Floor
Car Manufacturing by the Japanese
Toyota's First Production Model
Toyota's Early Production Cars
Nissan's Early Production Cars
Continuation of Trial Manufacturing
Application of Pre-war Technology
Introduction of Foreign Automotive Technology
Completion of Full-Scale Domestic Production
From Cycle cars to Lightweight Cars
Technological Developments Leading to Popularization
Response to Consumers' Diversifying Needs
Development of High-Performance Sports Cars
Stepping Toward the Future
 
Nissan Austin Model A50
Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. joined with Britain's Austin and began production of the A40 Somerset in April 1953, followed by the production of the A50 Cambridge in 1955. Its splendid ride and excellent maneuverability outshone domestically produced cars of that time and made it very popular. Above all, the technology received from their cooperation allowed Nissan, in its next independent projects, to follow up with another highly regarded, new model. Nissan Austin Model A50
Hino Renault Model PA62
Hino Renault Model PA62 Hino Motors Ltd. known today as a maker of heavy vehicles such as buses and trucks, tied up with Renault of France and in 1953 began production of the Renault 4CV. Adopting a somewhat unconventional style, it had a rear engine and rear-wheel drive and offered a superior ride. Because of its compact size, it was adopted for use as a taxi. Hino, too, contributed to the growing strength of Japan's manufacturing industry by independently implementing the technology gained from Renault to introduce the Contessa 900 in 1961 and the Contessa 1300 in 1964. This advanced the domestic motorization boom even further.
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