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Vehicles with (*) are not on display at the moment and some cars may not on display temporarily.

Japanese Mass Production
Main Building, the 3nd floor/Car Manufacturing by the Japanese
From Cycle cars to Lightweight Cars
During the post-war period, an automobile was still an unattainable purchase for members of the general public. Japan responded to this situation by producing large numbers of small, lightweight compact cars that quickly replaced cycle cars. The economical compact greatly influenced, and became the foundation for, Japan's idea of a popular car.
Main Building, the 2nd floor Main Building, the 3nd floor Annex, the 2nd Floor
Car Manufacturing by the Japanese
Toyota's First Production Model
Toyota's Early Production Cars
Nissan's Early Production Cars
Continuation of Trial Manufacturing
Application of Pre-war Technology
Introduction of Foreign Automotive Technology
Completion of Full-Scale Domestic Production
From Cycle cars to Lightweight Cars
Technological Developments Leading to Popularization
Response to Consumers' Diversifying Needs
Development of High-Performance Sports Cars
Stepping Toward the Future
 
Flying Feather
Flying Feather Living up to its name, the Flying Feather was the realization of designer Tomiya's dream"to build an extremely economical car."It was released in 1954 by Suminoe Works, a Nissan affiliate. It was Spartan in style, employed only the very basic components, and was designed to be a functional means of transport. However, in 1955, less than 200 cars had crossed the assembly line when production was stopped. Its sensible but stripped-down functionality was not understood at that time.
Fujicabin Model 5A
Fuji Motors Co., Nissan's affiliate engine maker, produced a cabin-style three-wheeler that utilized the epoch-making FRP for full monocoque construction designed by Tomiya, who also designed the Flying Feather. It was equipped with an aircooled, two-stroke, one-cylinder engine. The body weighed only 130kg and it could attain the high speed of 60km/h. Its aerodynamic body design and other features were revolutionary, but the FRP technology could not keep pace and only 85 cars were produced. Fujicabin Model 5A
Daihatsu Midget Model DKA
 
Daihatsu Midget Model DKA For a period after the war, cars were restricted to official use in Japan. Later, the popularization of the car came about through the commercial car. It was the release of the three-wheeled Midget in 1957 which finally put the car in the hands of the people. It had a low price and was easy to handle. Furthermore, the fact that it could be driven with a light vehicle license led to explosive sales. It was the representative three-wheeler of the time. The first DKA model had a kickstarter and a handlebar, similar to that of a motorcycle. The efforts to decrease costs and to standardize were readily apparent.
Cony Guppy Sports
Aichi Machine Industry Co., Ltd. launched the Cony Guppy, an ultra-light truck smaller than a minivehicle with a loading capacity of 100kg. In addition to its low price of  ¥225,000, the Cony Guppy featured four-wheel independent suspension and a torque converter for clutchless operation. Production ended after a little over one year, with less than 5,000 units manufactured in total.
The display vehicle was customized by the dealer, Aichi Giant Co., Ltd. Into a convertible.
Cony Guppy Sport Model AF8
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